Hopeful about the future of Tumblr

Eight months ago, I made the switch to WordPress. I couldn’t bear it anymore. And honestly I was bracing myself for a possible shutdown of the service by Verizon given their lack of interest or understanding of Tumblr.

WordPress has been great. It’s a rock solid platform and I control my little part of the web over here.

But I miss the Tumblr. I miss the simplicity and elegance. I miss the ease of adding multiple photographs to a single post. Or finding great music. But mostly, I miss the community.

Last week, something very exciting happened to the world of Tumblr. The company behind WordPress acquired Tumblr.

As I wrote on Twitter the day the news broke, I am really happy about this news and hopeful about the future of Tumblr.

Perhaps I will switch back soon.

Love you Tumblr.

A new episode of Hallway Chat

Nabeel and I started our little podcast when we were both working out of the same office at Spark and would spend time in between meetings in the hallway chatting about things on our mind. We hit the record button and made our first podcast seven years ago.

Our recording schedule has been ad hoc to say the least but I’m happy we still do it from time to time. Yesterday we sat down and recorded our 31st episode of Hallway Chat. As usual we started talking and just hit the record button. Sorry about the audio quality, I didn’t have my good microphone with me. Anyway, here is the two of us talking about things on our minds lately including:

-is VC pattern recognition actually valuable
-what does the decline of the iPhone mean to Apple’s future
-the potential for single purpose electronics
-challenging the dogma of “winner takes all” markets in startups.

Hope you like it and please send us tweets (@bijan or @nabeel) with suggestions for a future episode :)

Inside Passage, Alaska

After leaving Tutka Bay, the last week of our Alaska trip was an exploration of the Inside Passage, which began in Sitka and ended in Juneau. The landscape and wildlife in southeast Alaska is magical and Glacier Bay National Park felt like a dream.

Alaska is a remote place, especially coming from the east coast of the United States. It took a long time to get there and a long time to get home. It’s challenging to get around once you make it to Alaska. But it’s so worth it and I hope to get back, again and again.

waterfall.jpgmountain clouds.jpgwhale.jpgkayak hole.jpgglacier raft.jpgice boat.jpgsun mountain.jpgwhale tail.jpghouse flowers.jpgsea lion.jpgglacier zodiak.jpgGlacier sunset.jpgglacier little raft.jpgsun plane.jpg

(Cameras: Hasselblad 503cw and Leica M3 | Film: Kodak Portra 400 | Lab: Richard Photo Lab)

 

Kachemak Bay & Katmai National Park

We took a small bush plane out of Denali and then a train to Anchorage where we spent a night. The next morning we boarded a sea plane and flew to Kachemak Bay. We stayed at Tutka Bay Lodge which was located in a perfect spot. Right on the water, surrounded by gorgeous mountains. This part of Alaska was dramatically different than Denali but beautiful in it’s own way. It feels remote but is just a quick 20 minute boat ride to Homer.

We spent the next three days at Tutka Bay and would enjoy each day exploring the local trails and getting out on kayaks.

The highlight of our stay was a gorgeous flight to Katmai National Park to see the brown bears. The bears were so calm and focused on eating that they barely paid any attention to us — even though we were completely fixed on their every move.

I was really sad to leave this special place. I hope we can make it back again in the near future.

Our next stop was meeting up with my parents and Lauren’s mom for a cruise. But I’ll leave that for my next post.

landscape bay.jpgellie and lauren.jpgkayak.jpgseal.jpgtub and house.jpgkayak 3.jpgwalk and chair.jpgbear.jpgplanes bay.jpglauren bay.jpgbear water.jpgbear sqaure.jpglandscape james.jpg

(Cameras: Hasselblad 503cw & Leica M3, Film: Kodak Portra 400 & Kodak Tri-X 400, Lab: Richard Photo Lab in California)